The Educated Imagination Northrop Frye on

The Educated Imagination Northrop Frye on

The Educated Imagination Northrop Frye on

The Educated Imagination Northrop Frye on

Richard Feynman, Professor and Nobel Prize winner physicist winner only had an IQ of 125. Intelligent, but only in the tenuous spectrum that we usually think of genius.

This trivia is usually polite to show the folly of IQ tests. If an obvious genius does not qualify for Mensa, is how valid it is possible for ordinary people?

After reading memoirs of Feynman, I came up with another idea. While his intelligence is clear, was what impressed me the most are persistent ideas hard learning. Is to read physical documents meticulously hours of duration and all their sources to an idea of the soil to understand.

The Educated Imagination Northrop Frye on

Perhaps not genius best defined by raw intellectual ability. Instead, it is perhaps the appetite for hard disk ideas that someone intelligent.

Intelligence as resistance

The two declarations are not mutually exclusive. Feynman the intelligence was probably underestimated by the intelligence test, although he also had a great thirst for difficult problems.

Despite this, it has intelligence as resistance to empirical support. Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, studied the effect of attitudes in intelligence. Students who believed smarts were malleable wanted to acquire the most difficult challenges and more intelligent than students with more talent but less motivation was.